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The Judges' Page

The Judges' Page newsletter is published by the National CASA Association and the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.

The Need for Trauma–Informed
Dependency Courts

judge j. dean lewisWinter 2015

J. Dean Lewis, Judge (retired)
Former Member, National CASA Association Board of Trustees
Past President, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

What is a trauma-informed dependency court? Why is it critical to positive outcomes for children and youth, families and caregivers, that those who participate in the dependency court systems be trained in trauma-informed care and implement trauma-informed policies, practices and services? How can judges and courts lead this effort?

Our authors will answer these questions in this issue of The Judges’ Page from the perspective of the judge, the attorney, the child and the CASA/GAL volunteer. They will provide you with research and training tools. They will share their experiences and encourage you to think of the dependency court from a totally different perspective.


Articles in This Issue

Trauma-Informed Courts and the Role of the Judge
Shawn C. Marsh, PhD, Chief Program Officer (Juvenile Law), National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.
Mari Kay Bickett, JD, Chief Executive Officer, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges


Ominous Trends in Foster Care: Can Trauma-Informed Courts Improve Outcomes?
Michael S. Piraino, CEO, National CASA Association


Making a Case for Why Trauma Isn’t Fading Away
Kelly Decker, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, National Center for Child Traumatic Stress


The Trauma-Informed Judge: Asking All the Right Questions
Judge Mary E. Triggiano, Milwaukee County Circuit Court, Wisconsin


Building Trauma-Informed Dependency Courts by Using the Web-Based Tool “Trauma Informed Care: Perspectives and Resources”
Eileen Elias, MEd
Kathryne O’Grady, JD, Child Welfare Policy Director, National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health
Sherry Peters, MSW, ACSW, Assistant Professor and Senior Policy Associate, Georgetown University


Using a Trauma Lens
Judge Lynn Tepper, 6th Judicial Circuit, Pasco, Florida


One Way of Being a More Trauma-Responsive Court
Judge Doug Johnson, Separate Juvenile Court of Douglas County, Nebraska
Tammy Quick, Supervisor, CASA for Douglas County


The Unique Role of the CASA Volunteer: Hearing Things That Cannot Be Said
Amanda Kasper, MPH, CASA Volunteer


Understanding Trauma and Its Impact on Child Clients
Eva J. Klain, Director of the Child and Adolescent Health Project, ABA Center on Children and the Law

Copyright 2014, American Bar Association. Reprinted with permission from the ABA Center on Children and the Law. All rights reserved. This article is part of a series on trauma and children in the child welfare system and will be compiled into a forthcoming book. For more articles, visit www.childlawpractice.org


Peacemaking: An Ancient System with Modern Applications
Victoria Sweet, JD, Senior Policy Analyst, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges


The National CASA Network Responds to Advocates’ Need for Trauma-Informed Training
Michael S. Piraino, CEO, National CASA Association


Web Resources
Lindsay Stares, Communications Department, National CASA Association


The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges took the lead in securing articles for this issue of The Judges’ Page and we thank the NCJFCJ staff for sharing their research and expertise in encouraging the creation of trauma-informed courts.

The comments of article authors do not necessarily reflect the policies of the National CASA Association or the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.

 
The US Department of Justice has supported CASA advocacy since 1985 through its Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.
This Web site is funded in part through a grant from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Deliquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Neither the US Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).