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Frequently Asked Questions

In an effort to provide you with the quickest information, please find answers below to questions we often receive.

 

Volunteering and Jobs

Children in Need

How do I become a volunteer? Can I report abuse or neglect to you?
When is the next training? I know a child who needs a CASA advocate, how do I get one?
I contacted the local program, but they didn’t get back to me! What do I do? I’m involved in a custody case that doesn’t involve abuse or neglect. Can you help?
There isn’t a program near me, but I want to volunteer. How do CASA volunteers help children?
Are there any available jobs with CASA programs?

 

Please review the responses to these frequently asked questions before contacting National CASA. If your question is not addressed, you may contact National CASA staff in Seattle via this web form.

Please understand that if your question is answered below, we may not be able to respond to you individually.

 

Volunteering and Jobs

How do I become a volunteer?

There are nearly 940 local CASA programs across the United States. You should contact your local program directly for a volunteer application. Search at CASAforChildren.org/find to find your local program and the inquiry form you fill out will be sent directly to them.

When is the next training?

With over 900 programs, the best way to find out about training dates and schedules is to contact your local program. National Staff are unable to respond to this question.

I contacted the local program, but they didn’t get back to me! What do I do?

If it has been at least 3 weeks since you submitted the form and no one has sent you more information, please contact National staff via this form. You must include the county or city and the state of the program you were trying to contact. 

There isn’t a program near me, but I want to volunteer.

Please double check. Some states, like Florida, have a program in every district, but because the counties are very large, the main office might not be close by and it might not seem as if there is an location that serves your area. You can contact the closest program to find out if they have a secondary office nearer to you.

Nope, still no program. But I think there should be!

Our local programs are grassroots organizations that are developed and operated by caring citizens in their community in conjunction with their local courts and judges. If you are interested in founding a new program in your community, please see instructions and information here.

Are there any available jobs with CASA programs?

Please note that the majority of paid positions with CASA programs do not work directly with children. Our trained child advocates are unpaid volunteers. Paid positions are generally administrative. You can find out about openings with CASA programs all over the country on the Jobs page. Or contact your local program through the volunteer search and indicate in the comment box your interest in paid work. 

Children in Need

Can I report abuse or neglect to you?

No. I apologize but National CASA does not have the authority to investigate reports of maltreatment.

If you feel that children are in immediate danger please contact your local authorities right away or call 911.

You can also make a report with the ChildHelp National Child Abuse hotline at 1-800-422-4453. For more information see their website http://www.childhelp.org. The crisis counselors at ChildHelp will be able to answer questions about reporting abuse, even if you don't want to make a report today. 

I know a child who needs a CASA advocate, how do I get one?

If the child is currently in foster care or state custody, you can ask the judge overseeing the case if he or she would consider appointing a CASA advocate to their case, or have someone, such as legal counsel, ask on your behalf. CASA volunteers do not choose which cases they are appointed to, and there are many more cases than available volunteers. National CASA cannot appoint advocates.

If you need legal assistance, you can find out about low cost or pro bono legal representation near you on the American Bar Association’s website: www.findlegalhelp.org.

I’m involved in a custody case that doesn’t involve abuse or neglect. Can CASA help?

CASA/GAL volunteers can only advocate for children who are currently in foster care or otherwise under the supervision of a dependency court. I apologize but we do not provide legal services that might be of assistance in circumstances of divorce or similar custody cases. Our volunteers make recommendations to a judge on whether reunification or adoption is appropriate for children in foster care. Some local programs may know of other resources in your area; search online for 'CASA' and your state or county for office contact information.

If you need legal assistance, you can find out about low cost or pro bono legal representation near you by using the American Bar Association’s website: www.findlegalhelp.org. 

How do CASA volunteers help children? 

CASA volunteers are appointed by judges to watch over and advocate for abused and neglected children, to make sure they don’t get lost in the overburdened legal and social service system or languish in inappropriate group or foster homes. Volunteers stay with each case until it is closed and the child is placed in a safe, permanent home. For many abused children, their CASA volunteer will be the one constant adult presence in their lives.

More Questions?

If you have a question not answered above, contact National Staff via this form

 

The US Department of Justice has supported CASA advocacy since 1985 through its Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.
This Web site is funded in part through a grant from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Deliquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Neither the US Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).