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March 2010

Crossover Cases: Children and Youth Involved in the Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Systems

Collaboration and coordination—among public agencies, attorneys, judges and CASA volunteersare critical when dealing with crossover cases. This issue of The Judges' Page reviews multiple aspects of handling the crossover case. Thanks to the Permanency Planning for Children Department for taking the lead in securing most of the articles for this issue.

Articles:

Crossover Cases: Children and Youth Involved in the Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Systems
J. Dean Lewis, Judge (retired), Former Member, National CASA Association Board of Directors
Past President, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

Summary: Crossover cases vary in definition but share several commonalities: these are challenging cases which require collaboration and coordination among all entities involved to achieve positive outcomes for youth. Article...


NCJFCJ Recognizes and Actively Addresses Needs of Crossover Youth
Mary Mentaberry, Executive Director, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

Summary: Throughout the process of guiding systemic change in both dependency and delinquency cases, it has become clear to model court lead judges and others within NCJFCJ that there is significant overlap in one particular area: the crossover youth population involved or at risk of being involved in both the dependency and delinquency systems. Article...


Message from the President of NCJFCJ
Judge Douglas F. Johnson, President, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

Summary: For those who have crossover youth in delinquency and dependency courts, I encourage you to break down the silos between courts to better serve these youth and families. Article...


The Leadership Role of the Judge in Coordinating the Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare System to Achieve Effective Outcomes
Judge Ernestine Gray, Chief Judge, Orleans Parish Juvenile Court, New Orleans, LA
President, National CASA Association Board of Trustees

Summary: Now is the time for juvenile court judges, as a part of their leadership, to call attention to the special needs of crossover youth and use their collaboration skills to bring the various systems together to more effectively manage these cases. Article...


National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Cross-Over Committee
Judge Amy Davenport, Administrative Judge, Superior Court of Vermont, Member, NCJFCJ Board of Trustees
Judge Patricia Escher, Presiding Juvenile Court Judge, Pima County Juvenile Court Center, Tucson, AZ
Judge Nan Waller, Circuit Court Judge, Multnomah County Courthouse, Portland, OR
   
The three authors serve on the NCJFCJ Cross-Over Committee.

Summary: Achieving successful outcomes for crossover youth relies on effective collaboration both inside and outside the court. The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges has made crossover youth a priority by creating a cross-departmental committee to develop practice recommendations for judges hearing family and juvenile cases. Article...


Red Rover, Red Rover, Our Youth Are Crossover
Karen Adam, Commissioner, Pima County Juvenile Court, Co-Lead Judge, Tucson Model Court Member, NCJFCJ Board of Trustees

Summary: In Pima County, the crossover effort has evolved into a sophisticated and nuanced system for ensuring the best possible results for children and families. Article...


Resiliency and Crossover: A Framework for Case Conceptualization
Jessica Pearce, Projects Coordinator, Juvenile and Family Law Department, NCJFCJ
Shawn C. Marsh, PhD, Director, Juvenile and Family Law Department, NCJFCJ

Summary: The judicial system has traditionally focused on reducing risk. We must also work to cultivate protective factors by developing a process for identifying enhancing and these attributes. Article...


Summary of “Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice: Two Sides of the Same Coin”
Shay Bilchik, Director, The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University
Former Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

Judge Michael Nash, Presiding Judge, Juvenile Court in the Los Angeles Superior Court
Secretary, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

Summary: Paula Campbell summarizes the author’s two-part series on the topic of crossover youth, which originally appeared in the Fall 2008 and Winter 2009 issues of NCJFCJ Today magazine. Article...


Summary of “An Imperative: Evidenced-Based Practice within the Child Welfare System of Care”
Candice L. Maze, JD, Consultant, Maze Consulting, Inc.

Summary: Synopsis of an article authored by Maze and others about the importance of evidence-based practice published in the Fall 2009 issue of Juvenile & Family Justice Today. Article...


Crossover Children Need CASA Volunteers
Jeanne Meurer, Lead Judge, Travis County’s Model Delinquency Court, Austin, TX
John Hathaway, Associate Judge, Travis County Juvenile Court and District Court, Austin, TX

Summary: We see in court everyday that CASA is an invaluable partner in reducing upheavals and moving children more quickly to safe, permanent homes. We look forward to the day when every abused and neglected child, including all crossover youth, will have the life changing benefit of a CASA volunteer. Article...


Meaningful Advocacy for the Dually Involved Youth
Cynthia Chauvin, Director, CASA Jefferson, Jefferson Parish Juvenile Court, Harvey, LA

Summary: Children in foster care who cross over into the delinquent population almost immediately forfeit their victim status. As advocates for child victims, CASA/GAL volunteers play a critical role in maintaining the child victim’s status. Article...


The Power of a CASA Volunteer in Juvenile Court
Carrie-Leigh Cloutier, Executive Director, Chaves County CASA Program, Roswell, NM

Summary: CASA volunteers are valued in juvenile court just the same way they are in dependency court. The Chaves County CASA Program has been training volunteers to provide advocacy in juvenile court since 1995. Article...


Policy Update: ABA Calls for Reform in Child Welfare/Delinquency "Crossover" Cases
Howard Davidson, Director, American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law

Summary:  In this article, reprinted with permission, the author
shares the ABA Commission on Youth At Risk’s call for reform in the handling of crossover cases. (246.78 KB PDF) Article...

Web Resources: Dual-Jurisdiction Youth
Paula Campbell, Permanency Planning for Children Department, NCJFCJ

Summary: Children who are involved in dependency courts are more likely to become involved in delinquency courts. The resources listed below contain useful links and resources to help courts work together and address the particular needs of dual jurisdiction youth. Article...


Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Implications for the Juvenile Justice System
Kathryn Wosser Page, PhD, Mental Health Coordinator, Canal Alliance

Summary: Among foster children, emotional, behavioral and developmental problems are thought to be present at a rate three to six time greater than children in the general population. It is likely that FASD is a culprit in the "crossover" phenomenon. Article...


The Importance of Early Identification of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)
Kathryn Kelly, Project Director, FAS/FAE Legal Issues Resource Center, University of Washington

Summary: The court, by requiring that inquiries be made early on regarding alcohol exposure in utero and ordering diagnostic evaluations when appropriate, can radically alter the population of juvenile court, the adult criminal justice system and corrections as well as influencing treatment programs for sexual deviancy, mental illness and drug abuse. Article... (reprint from February 2005 Judges' Page newsletter)


The comments of article authors do not necessarily reflect the policies of the National CASA Association or the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.

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